Creeks and Southerners: Biculturalism on the Early American Frontier

“While Frank skillfully contextualizes his story within Creek and colonial history, his focus is on the people who, like Cornell, were Creeks and white southerners. . . . Elegantly written, impeccably organized, and deeply researched in English and Spanish sources, Creeks and Southerners is a welcome addition to the booming field of pre-removal Creek history.”—Kathleen DuVal, Western Historical Quarterly

"a sophisticated, well-written account of Creek society in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Frank draws on . . . many fascinating frontier characters [relating them] to the larger forces forging a new social landscape around them."—Gregory A. Waselkov, Alabama Review

 

“This insightful and well-researched volume analyzes the common ground between the Muscogees and white Americans in a shared environment and persuades readers to think about mixed-blood Creeks who participated in two cultures at the same time.”—Donald L. Fixico, Montana: The Magazine of Western History

“a thorough understanding of how culture and kinship affected internal and external relations such as trade and alliances. Creeks and Southerners is a nice contribution to the literature on the history of the southeastern Indians.”—Rebecca Seaman, Journal of Southern History

"Frank has significantly expanded our knowledge about how the endurance of clan and village life in one southeastern Indian society shaped intercultural relations over a long span of time."—Daniel H. Usner, Jr., American Historical Review

 

“Serious studies of race and identity in the American South are forced to confront a highly charged and complex history that continues to haunt us today. As a new attempt to see through those dark waters, Andrew K. Frank’s Creeks and Southerners is a welcome and courageous work of scholarship. . . . [It] is a valuable effort to gain insight into a neglected area of southern scholarship.”—William L. Ramsey, Journal of American History